Archives for Category / Front-End Development

  • The Secret Life of Forms

    CSS Dev Conference 2016 - San Antonio, Texas

    Slides – http://www.slideshare.net/IvanWilson3/the-secret-life-of-form-67435952
    Lecture – https://cssdevconf2016.sched.com/event/7Q0d/the-secret-life-of-forms-secretforms

    One of the highlights of the year was lecturing for the first time at a conference. In this case, CSS Dev Conference at San Antonio, TX. Basically, I decided to take some advice and take a chance. After sending my proposal, I was shocked and thrilled to be selected via anonymous vote in July.

    Of course, getting the talk ready was even harder than the waiting. It took months of writing and editing and practice. But I was able to get it together and delivered it a small audience at the conference on October 17, 2016. This talk was about UX, coding, and forms. However, it was peppered with things that I’ve done during the last ten years at CDG/Innate.

    That said, I want to thank my fellow co-workers – including Lisa Crotty for her advice, Brian Schlansky for his time and his ear while prepping the talk, and Scott Adams (company CEO) for letting me do one final practice in front of the company for a much needed warm-up.

    I also want to thank the other speakers at the conference in helping me not only relax but also giving me advice for speaking not just for the first time but also their experiences in giving lectures as well.

    And finally, I want to thank Christopher Schmitt, Ari Stiles, and Elizabeth Moore in helping me make my first-time experience as a lecturer a wonderful and memorable one. It means so much when for years I was attendee, to be not only speaking but giving back to the community that I respect.

    Thank you all 🙂

    Lecture - The Secret Life of Forms, left - notebook, right - presenter pass

  • Revisiting The Art of Responsive Design

    The Art of Responsive Design (Innate Blog)

    About a year ago, I wrote a blog post about responsive design. But instead of the usual techniques, I decided to describe it with three terms – Constraints, Content, and Context.

    A year later, these three terms are more relevant than ever, especially Context. I am thinking about re-editing the post for brevity but the main points will remain.

    Update (12/9/2016): Innate republished the blog post today (thanks!) and it will be the source of a new lecture sometime in mid/late 2017. *fingers crossed*

    The Art of Responsive Design (2017) - Notebook

  • A critique.

    In our efforts to be cutting edge, we (front end developers) have made one of the biggest revolutions in human history, the mobile revolution, based on the concept of information being free, open, and democratic into something else: undemocratic, siloed, and tribal.

    And we have ourselves to blame.

    So. What are we going to do about it?

  • Coding The Problem

    There is this “thing” that has been nagging me for almost a year.

    Basically, it’s a conversion that I had with a CEO of a company. Anyways, during the course of the conversation, he brings out this remark:

    “Your job is to code, just like the designer’s job is to design.”

    That comment bothered me. It wasn’t a comment bore of malice or ignorance. It had some truth to it. But it missed an important point. It was the equivalent of saying “My job is to write HTML.”

    Now, there’s nothing bad; that is part of my job. But only a part.

    No, my annoyance is this:

    If my job was just coding, then I’m not doing a good enough job.

    OK. Let me explain.

    Coding is (relatively) easy. Businesses can pick and choose what company or freelancers to do the work. For a cheap price, the work can be farmed out to anyone of the many off-shore companies at will.

    Altogether, that the big talent pool of coding talent.

    You, (client/CEO) have to go through this massive pool to find the right person. But that is not what you are looking for. The truth is that you are not looking for someone to code.

    You need someone to solve your problem.

    As for coding? It’s a means to an end. Employers don’t hire people who code; they hire people who can solve their problems. (And also it’s the same thing that will keep them around…)

    Now, I wish he was around when I said this. I have no doubt that both of us would be agreement.

    There was another thing that he said, in jest, but in hindsight just as important. Basically, people like myself like the “shiny, new projects”. And yes, I admit, they are the nice ones to work on.

    But. There is a group of problems, the “old – fixed it just for now” problems that really need attention. The ones that are begging for someone to just look at and say “you know, if you give me some time, I think I could make this better.”

    There are lots of those problems that need serious attention, not the million dollar, new app of the month ones.

    Then, there is The Content Problem.